California National Party Platform

THE CNP PLATFORM

  • Platform for Prosperity
    California is a major world power and should have an economic platform that recognizes and supports that.

    Adopted by consensus 2:44 9/10/2016

    1. California must get a fair deal as long as we remain part of the United States. Currently we receive approximately $0.78 in federal money for every dollar of federal taxes we pay while other states receive in excess of two dollars for every dollar they contribute. That extra spending is paid for by our taxes. We demand an immediate end to this unjustifiable policy. California can no longer be expected to subsidize other states while our own needs go unmet.
    2. In order to stimulate our economy, we advocate simplification of the tax code and progressive taxation. Income tax should tax all income and do so in a way that encourages people to invest wealth instead of hoarding it, as the US did under Eisenhower.
    3. We also advocate changes to taxation law around stock options so people with stock options for pre-IPO companies pay taxes on them when the company goes public – not when they exercise the options.
    4. We advocate universal health care as outlined in our healthcare platform. This removes the burden of paying for employee healthcare from businesses, which in turn removes a major barrier to entry for startups and small businesses
    5. Creation of a National (Californian) Credit Union, owned by the citizens of California. This will function as the National Bank of the Republic of California, hold our gold and other precious metal reserves, and also manage the Innovation and Equity funds described below. The President of the Republic of California will be the President of the board overseeing the Credit Union and it will be subject to independent audits every 5 years.
    6. We propose a ban on high-interest payday loan and check cashing businesses that prey on poor and working class people and charge unconscionable fees for basic services. We propose to instead add branches of the national credit union to all post offices to make sure that all Californians have access to low-cost banking services in their local communities.
    7. A Cabinet-level Office of Innovation whose mandate is to find ways to
      1. Leverage technology to make government more responsive, efficient, and democratic
      2. Strategically invest in new and disruptive technologies that can improve quality of life
      3. Oversee the Innovation Fund
    8. We advocate for creation of a National (Californian) Innovation fund that provides funding for science and pure research in-line with what the most progressive EU nations provide. While there is plenty of funding for research with immediate commercial applications, America has relatively little funding for pure research and many scientists move to Europe as a result.
      1. California should retain patents on technology created, license those patents to businesses that pay taxes in California at a discount in order to encourage tech companies to locate here, and apply the profits towards an endowment for the fund to help it grow and become self-sustaining over time.
      2. This innovation fund can also finance research aimed at improving desalination and clean energy technologies that are critical for California’s long-term security.
    9. End local cable monopolies and remove barriers to entry for new data carriers such as Google Fiber to improve our data infrastructure. This will spur investment. Cable monopolies who have no competitors have failed to invest in infrastructure and left California with internet speeds slower than most other developed nations. This is unacceptable.
    10. Address Economic inequality
      1. Housing-First approach to reintegrating homeless people with the goal of ending homelessness in California. This approach must integrate health care, counseling, job training, and a full range of supportive services.
        • A supportive housing-first approach actually costs less once the reduction in emergency room costs are factored in.
        • We demand a federal ban on bussing programs where cities and counties across America “solve” their homelessness problems by giving people one-way tickets out of town. A disproportionate number of those people end up in California and it is not fair to expect California to pay to rehabilitate the rest of America’s homeless population.
        • In cases where the State of California can positively identify that someone receiving public assistance here arrived via one of these programs, we should bill the municipality that sent them for the cost of services plus a significant penalty.
      2. Encourage entrepreneurship among working class communities where people lack the skills and connections that make so many startups run by wealthier people possible.
        • The Republic of California will fund free public classes on how to start and run a business successfully.
        • California will make micro-credit loans available through the national credit union to individuals who complete courses or have equivalent experience and can produce a viable risk-assessed business plan; as well as meeting other reasonable requirements. Micro-credit loans have been proven effective at bringing people, and women in particular, out of poverty all over the world. They also have very high payback rates.
      3. We advocate adding funding for mid-career retraining. Changing technology means whole industries are becoming obsolete and the average worker will change industries multiple times. We need our workforce to be able to re-train to seize new opportunities. This must include:
        • Investment into adult education and community college courses to help people change careers and move into strategic including STEM.
        • Public-private partnership to help place graduates of these programs into jobs in the relevant industries.
        • Measures to ensure access to these programs for low-income and working class people. This includes scholarships, cost of living supports, transportation costs, and low-interest loans as well as counseling and placement resources. Anyone who wants to lift their family out of poverty should be able to access the resources needed to do so.
      4. The CNP believes that the Republic of California should mandate equal pay for equal work for all genders and individuals regardless of race, sexual orientation, or religion.  This is a basic civil right.
      5. We must end racial segregation of neighborhoods in California.  Many of California’s urban areas have racially and economically segregated neighborhoods as a result of the legacy of federal housing programs that required segregation up until 1968.  Even after these practices were officially abolished, illegal redlining has continued.  Since career opportunities are often determined by personal connections, segregation of communities directly contributes to economic isolation of historically oppressed populations.
        • Criminal prosecution of individuals who work at financial institutions and participate in redlining, predatory lending, and other practices that strip wealth from our most vulnerable communities.
        • Focused investment into infrastructure, parks, schools (see education platform), and public services street cleaning for example) in historically marginalized communities.
        • End creation of ‘poverty islands’ in public housing.  Low-income housing should be integrated into neighborhoods statewide.
    11. Six months of mandatory parental leave for all new parents at full pay, which is in-line with the norms in the rest of the industrialized world.
      • Parental leave is important for bonding between parents and new children and has significant benefits for the health of children.
    12. National arts fund in line with EU standards to fund the arts
      1. Renewed investment in public works and art, as was done during the new deal. Public art is cheap and has significant economic and cultural benefits over the long term.
      2. The Republic of California will mandate that radio and television stations broadcast on publicly owned airwaves must play at least 20% music or other locally produced content by people from their local regions in order to ensure local artists have a chance at exposure and can gain traction.
        • Media consolidation has created significant barriers to entry for artists and musicians and resulted in a much less competitive media market.  This is bad for artists and bad for the industry itself in the long term.  This proposal is based on a very successful similar law in France that has had significant positive economic and cultural impacts while costing virtually nothing to implement.
    13. Full protection for California’s parks and public lands
      1. We believe the federal government should turn over all federal lands in California to the government of California.  The federal government has failed in their duty to protect and preserve our wild spaces and our own park service could do a far better job.
      2. End clear-cutting and strip mining in government-owned lands.
        • Healthy forests are essential for healthy streams and water systems, which in turn support our fisheries.  They also provide critical carbon sequestration and habitat for endangered species; and California’s wild places draw thousands of tourists every year.
        • We should mimic Germany’s approach to forest management which relies on selective logging to reduce fire risk instead of cutting down entire sections of forest and replanting with monoculture.
      3. We believe that California must end the privatization of public lands and keep our public resources available to the public.
      4. We advocate for increased funding for the creation and maintenance of urban green spaces and parks.
        • Catalonia has done wonders in creating open inviting public spaces at the centers of their cities and towns with abundant play spaces for children integrated into public plazas surrounded by cafes.  This allows parents to go out in the evening and be social with their neighbors and builds a sense of community and social cohesion among both them and their children.  We urge Californian city planners to adopt similar models, with appropriate local adaptations.
    14. Creation of a fund, held by the National Credit Union, whose mandate is to provide financing, counseling, and logistical support to workers who want to buy their workplaces and turn them into democratically run cooperatives.  These would be owned by the employees, not the government, and the loans would be paid back with interest to cover administration costs.
      • Worker owned businesses don’t export jobs and downsize workers. They pay living wages, contribute significantly more to community organizations, and have happier healthier workforces. California already has thousands of worker-owned businesses and would benefit from having thousands more.
    15. Overhaul of Patent law to encourage and reward innovation instead of erecting unnecessary barriers to entry.  This includes reinstating limits on Copyright and restore the original constitutional guidelines and eliminating the 17-year ‘Steamboat Willy’ copyright extension by Congress. Copyrights exist as an incentive towards innovation, extending them infinitely does nothing to spur innovation and creates unnecessary barriers to entry in the market.
    16. The Californian government must support and defend the right of workers to organize for collective bargaining, forming unions, and advocating for their collective interests.
    17. The Republic of California should adopt a Universal Basic Income for all citizens.  Automation makes this inevitable in the long term and the administration costs of UBI are far cheaper than the costs of administering multiple programs (welfare, unemployment, disability, student cost of living subsidies, etc.).
    18. The Republic of California should legalize hemp/cannabis. It is California’s biggest cash crop and prohibition prevents Californian industries from realizing the significant potential industrial uses of hemp as well as the economic benefits of legal cultivation. (Note that unlike the rest of this document, the proposal around Hemp was adopted by majority vote, not consensus).
  • Platform for Growth
    Adopted by consensus 4:24 9/10/2016

    California’s population and economy are booming. California ranks thirty-fifth among countries in population and sixth in economy, but for decades our infrastructure has been systematically starved by American politicians who see us as a cash cow and spend our money everywhere but here. It’s time to invest in California and create the modern infrastructure needed to provide a high standard of living for our citizens as well as provide the foundation for continued economic expansion and business competitiveness.  Our growth and development plan addresses challenges and opportunities in urban planning, transportation, clean energy production and distribution, water conservation, communications, and disaster prevention.

    1. Changes to the building code and permitting process:
      1. Simplification of building permits and environmental review in urban areas to support urban infill and avoid displacing people. Environmental review should be more efficient, not less stringent!  The lack of available high-density housing in urban cores is one of the key factors behind soaring housing prices in the Bay Area and other regions.  Failing to address this issue has significant negative repercussions in terms of sprawl, quality of life, and displacement of vulnerable communities.
      2. Phase-in upgrades to California’s building codes to make green building technology mandatory for new structures so that this new high-density construction has a positive net impact instead of a negative one.
      3. Subsidies and incentives for property owners to upgrade existing structures using appropriate green technology in order to reduce the environmental impact, energy consumption, and water usage.
    2. Massive investment in transportation infrastructure to end the freeway gridlock that wastes time and resources and reduces the quality of life in many of our cities.
      1. Transportation to be consolidated around regional hubs. Increase efficiency, remove bureaucracy. It’s inefficient  for the bay area to have a dozen agencies that each control different parts of public transit grid instead of a single plan for the entire region. Transit plan should be done in conjunction with regional housing plan.
      2. We support High speed rail state-wide
      3. Major upgrades and expansion for BART and other regional transit systems
      4. Simplification and streamlining of the approval process for mass transit
      5. Investments in freeways and automobile transit infrastructure as part of an integrated plan – not as the sole option.
      6. We also support a commission to investigate the feasibility of Solar Panel Roadways (CalTrans calls this “Integrating Solar Technology in Transportation Infrastructure”).
    3. Investment in water infrastructure
      1. Urban water collection should be the norm.  Israeli model is a good reference point here.
      2. Meters for the whole state (large areas of CA have no water meters!)
      3. Ban on neighborhood associations and other private entities fining people for not watering lawns.
      4. Green roofs and other water saving tech mandated on all new State buildings in short term and added to building code as a requirement over the long term.
      5. Major government-sponsored research into desalination to make CA the world leader in this technology so we can become a water exporter. The desert southwest should be importing water from CA long term instead of the other way around.
        • Keep 51% state ownership in desalination operations so revenue can support state budgets in future and repay the up-front taxpayer investment. Profits from this venture should be split between the Innovation fund and the State’s reserve fund outlined in the Platform for Prosperity.
        • Investment in water infrastructure to move water from coastal desalination to rural farming communities and ensure access to water for our farmers.
    4. Investment in power infrastructure
      1. Work in partnership with Californian industry through the innovation fund to make us a leader in green energy and smooth the transition to a post-carbon economy.  China is making massive investments into Solar production, for instance, and achieving economies of scale that privately funded American industry cannot match.
      2. We need focused investment into green energy and methods to reduce the carbon footprint of industry.
      3. Patents on this technology will give Californian businesses an edge in the coming post-carbon economy and be a valuable asset in their own right.
      4. The CNP advocates a permanent and immediate ban on Fracking within the Republic of California.  Fracking encourages dependences on fossil fuel technology, endangers our water supply, and causes earthquakes.
    5. California should invest in an earthquake early alert system similar to the Japanese system so that we can minimize deaths and injuries in the event of earthquakes.
  • Peace and Defense
    We believe that the Republic of California’s military needs can best be served through a highly organized national militia with a core professional army, based on the Swiss model, wherein the people of California  are the military. This model will save us many billions of dollars a year, build a sense of national pride and identity, and ensure our defense.

    1. California will adopt a stance of neutrality on the world stage.  We will enter mutual defense treaties with the other nations of North America but will not participate in peacekeeping actions or military interventions elsewhere in the world.
    2. All citizens will be expected to register for military service upon turning 18 and undergo basic training.  This militia will be run similarly to the current national guard where citizen-soldiers undergo basic training and then have to show up for specific short training exercises on a periodic basis.
    3. Persons who object to military service on religious or moral grounds may serve in a civilian peace corps instead. Citizens with physical disabilities preventing service in the field will have the option to serve in other capacities or in the peace corps.
    4. After the age of 20 all citizens will be expected to report for 2 weeks out of every year for training and service.  This service will be paid.  Hardship will allow deferment but the time must be made up as soon as the hardship has ended.
    5. California will maintain a small professional military made up of the best of the best who want to make a career out of military service.  This cadre of experienced professional soldiers will form the core of our national military should we need to mobilize on a large scale to defend ourselves. The professional military forces will include naval, air, and ground forces.
    6. Pursuant to our desire to maintain the United States as a key ally in defense once we have achieved independence, we propose the following to maintain peace and security in the first 25 years following independence:
      1. Establish a branch of the California government to coordinate joint military options, and act as the responsible agency for coordination with the US Department of Defense.
      2. Policy of unrestricted no-cost 25 year lease to the United States government for many existing military bases and facilities, with final terms to be negotiated.
        1. Special provisions will have to be established so California will have access to Vandenberg AFB/Space Port and its facilities.
      3. We propose joint operations at Edwards AFB, Travis, and Camp Roberts.
      4. California will work with the US Government as a partner to maintain current airspace restrictions over South Eastern California, currently used by the US Armed Forces for training exercises.
      5. After the 25 year period has elapsed, a reasonable use fee for the land and airspace under lease will be introduced. Fee schedule will increase over time, at a scale yet to be determined.
      6. Joint Navy/Air Force/Army training and operations and war games to be undertaken with the United States Department of Defense.
      7. Policy of sourcing California Military equipment from current companies that the United States Department of Defense does business with, at least at first. Maintain compatibility insofar as much as possible with US aircraft, ships, firearms, and weapons systems, as befits a close alliance between neighbors.
    7. Policy of tax exemptions and credits to entice defense contractors with substantial footprints in California to remain and continue operations within California.
    8. Pursuant to California’s desire to be capable of its own defense, we propose the following broad measures to be introduced by 5 years after independence:
      1. Reactivation of Mare Island Submarine Base and Naval base
      2. Reactivation of Alameda Naval Air Station
      3. Reactivation of Moffett Field into full a fully fledged Air Force base
      4. Reactivation and Modernization of Crow’s Landing Naval Auxiliary Airfield
      5. Begin planning and construction of several new military facilities, including Air Force bases within California.
      6. Acquisition of vessels of the Destroyer class to serve in a ‘Coast Guard’ style function.
      7. Acquisition of aircraft to serve in the naval Search & Rescue role (Boeing P-8 Poseidon)
      8. Acquire small but effective fleet of land based Fighter and Trainer aircraft from the United States government and defense contractors. Examples of aircraft could include former United States Air Force F-16, F-15E, and F/A-18 aircraft.
        1. Should the United States not wish to supply these aircraft, alternatives including the Dassault Rafale (France), Eurofighter Typhoon (European consortium aircraft), and Panavia Tornado (European consortium aircraft) will be considered.
    9. Begin preparation for a non-nuclear Submarine fleet to be serviced from Mare Island, and accept bids for fuel-cell powered hydrogen-electric submarines for coastal patrol and defense duties, to be built at Mare Island.
  • Universal Healthcare
    1. The CNP believes that the California should create a state-wide single payer public health plan based on the French model where not-for-profit entities compete for people’s business and the govt. sets prices in consultation with industry and pays the bill. This plan can be implemented immediately and does not require independence to complete.
    2. This maintains competition to keep quality high while controlling cost and is one reason the French are so much healthier and live longer than Americans.
    3. This system will only cover Californian citizens, legal residents, and visitors with a valid visa.
      1. California can negotiate mutual coverage with other nations that have universal healthcare so, for example, Californians could negotiate with EU so EU citizens visiting CA would be guaranteed coverage in Europe and Europeans would have it here. This removes a significant barrier to tourism.
      2. Others can access health care but have to pay the same cost the State would pay for a citizen +10%.
      3. This opens the path for medical tourism from the rest of US and is a boom for our economy, without bankrupting us paying the bill for people from other States who come here to access our public healthcare option.
      4. It also gives undocumented people reasonable access without encouraging people to come here illegally in order to access our healthcare system and leave Californian taxpayers with the bill.
  • Rule of Law
    Proposals passed by consensus except where noted. 9/10/2016

    1. California must reassert respect for Civil Rights and the Rule of Law.
      1. The CNP opposes the PATRIOT Act, mass government surveillance programs, and other violations of personal privacy by the State.
      2. The CNP demands greater judicial transparency and full due process for anyone accused of a crime. Indefinite detention without trial is unlawful and must not be allowed.
      3. The CNP strongly opposes the use of torture and extrajudicial killings and demands that the individuals responsible for these crimes be prosecuted.
      4. We oppose extrajudicial rendition by federal government.
      5. We believe that upon independence, California must join the International Criminal Court.
      6. California must also reinstate Habeas Corpus which has been in place since the Magna Carta and was illegally suspended as part of the “War on Terror.”
      7. California must provide protection for whistleblowers and others who expose corruption including a “Shield Law” like the ones in many other countries that allow journalists to refuse to name sources.
      8. Since reporting illegal behavior to the institution responsible for that behavior is more likely to result in retaliation than reform, we also support blanket immunity for anyone who brings to public knowledge information which reveals illegal behavior.
      9. The United States must stop shielding war criminals. Officials who have violated international human rights laws should be prosecuted and punished to the fullest extent of the law. This is critical to re-establish Rule of Law. We will push for this within the US as long as we remain part of the Union and make it an explicit part of our Constitution upon independence.
      10. California must ban confiscation of assets by law enforcement without due process
      11. As long as California remains part of the United States our government must respect the sovereign rights of indigenous Californians and exert pressure on the federal government to do the same.  Once we achieve independence indigenous Californians should have the option to either re-assert their right to autonomy and self-rule or to voluntarily join the Republic of California, as determined by a vote of each tribe’s members.
    2.  Privacy
      • The CNP opposes all government demands for industry to include encryption “back doors”. Back doors undermine security and violate the right to privacy of consumers.
      • We support an EU-style “right to be forgotten.” As technology becomes more pervasive and more personal information becomes available on the web, it is becoming increasingly difficult for citizens to monitor their online footprint. This can have significant negative impacts, particularly on young people. Therefore, the CNP supports  an individual’s right to have one’s personal information as well as any other content pertaining to that individual (such as texts or photographs), deleted and removed from any private website, server, or database upon request.
      • We demand full equality before the law and due process for all people. We oppose racially biased enforcement of laws.
      • We advocate stronger restrictions on the power of credit reporting agencies, and the situations in which a credit report can be obtained. Specifically, potential employers should not be able to demand a credit report unless it has a direct bearing on job performance or there is a security risk.
    3. We support regulation of Drones as necessary to preserve personal privacy.
    4. California should add language to our Constitution guaranteeing equality of opportunity for all Californians regardless of race, religion, orientation, gender, class, or other status.
      • As an organization, the CNP will place particular emphasis on including and empowering historically marginalized communities.
      • As a nation, California must do better to make sure that our young people have the opportunity to live up to their full potential. We cannot guarantee equality of outcomes, but everyone should at least have a chance.
      • This commitment must be more than just words and be reflected in all policy positions and actions.
    5. Broadcasting and Media:
      • The CNP advocates reforms to the way licensing for radio and TV stations is carried out to make it easier for people to start community radio and television  stations.  When all media is owned by a few corporations there is no freedom of the press.
      • Return to the fairness doctrine that used to guarantee fair and balanced news coverage in the US.   Airwaves are publicly owned and are leased to private entities (broadcasters), therefore the government is within its rights to demand that broadcasters not willfully distort the truth in exchange for gaining access to those airwaves.
      • We also support adding basic standards for truthfulness in journalism, similar to truth in advertising guidelines. (Canada has this and it works very well for them).
        Passed by majority 
      • We also support adding limitations on the number of radio and television stations that a single entity can own.
    6. Limits on Copyright.  Push to restore copyright back to original constitutional guidelines. Eliminate the 17-year ‘Steamboat Willy’ copyright extension by Congress. Copyrights exist as an incentive towards innovation, extending them infinitely does nothing to spur innovation and creates unnecessary barriers to entry in the market.
    7. The CNP endorses equal pay for equal work for all genders and individuals regardless of race, sexual orientation, or religion.
  • Judicial Reform
    Passed by consensus, except point 1.6.5 with was passed by majority. 9/10/2016

    Police Reforms

    The California National Party is horrified at the ongoing specter of violence against citizens by police within the United States. The time for platitudes has passed, we need real solutions. Therefore, we propose the following reforms which can be immediately enacted within California and replicated elsewhere to help re-establish trust between our communities and the officers who serve and protect them.

    1.  The California National Party supports mandating the use of body cameras by all law enforcement officers along  with clear policies dictating that:
      1. These cameras must be on and functioning at all times;
      2. Interfering with the recordings is not acceptable and will be treated as evidence of intent
      3. All footage and other video and audio evidence captured by the body cameras is public property that must be made available to the public in the event of complaints around use of force in order to either protect law enforcement officers who have been wrongly accused of excessive use of force, or to hold them accountable for abusing their authority.
    2. Collection of Demographic Data
      1. The California National Party supports implementing a statewide policy mandating the collection of demographic data for all police interactions and making that data available to the public.
    3. Use of Force: In order to ensure law enforcement officers who feel threatened have the tools they need to de-escalate dangerous situations, the California National Party proposes a statewide standardization of police use of force policies along with additional funding for mandatory training to:
      1. Make life preservation the primary principle shaping decisions about using force;
      2. Require law enforcement officers to de-escalate situations, where possible, by communicating with subjects, maintaining distance, and otherwise eliminating the need to use force;
      3. Prohibit law enforcement officers from choking and strangling civilians; and,
      4. Require law enforcement officers to intervene and stop excessive force used by other law enforcement officers, and report these incidents immediately to a supervisor.
      5. Police Officers who witness crimes committed by fellow officers and report those crimes shall be provided whistleblower protections.  Failure to report crimes by fellow officers is acting as an accessory to a crime and will be treated as such.
    4. Police Misconduct
      1. In order to ensure that law enforcement officers who abuse their power are held accountable, the California National Party supports the criminal prosecution of any officer of the law who engages in violence against civilians who are subdued or pose no credible threat to the law enforcement officer’s safety, and an automatic investigation by the California Attorney General’s Office when  a civilian dies or sustains serious injury while in law enforcement custody complete with public access to the findings of the investigation.
      2. Additionally, the California National Party believes that any inquiries into wrongdoing by police officers should be handled by special independent investigators appointed by the Chief executive of California.
      3. The California National Party supports state-level whistleblower protections for any law enforcement officer that reports police misconduct or supplies evidence for an ongoing investigation into police misconduct.
      4. In order to improve community-police relations, the California National Party supports establishing citizen oversight committees where feasible.
    5. Reforms to hiring and funding
      1. California must demilitarize our police departments by ending the federal government’s practice of giving or selling military hardware to police departments.
      2. We advocate major investment into community policing programs which have been repeatedly proven effective.  Community policing should be the default model.
      3. California should have a hiring preference for officers whose dedication to the community is shown through a focus on community service.
      4. End California’s usage of for-profit prisons that provide a financial incentive for incarceration.
      5. California should nationalize police department funding so that the Republic of California can ensure Police Departments are adequately funded and negotiate benefits and pay directly with police unions.  Having each city negotiate funding for police departments separately means that it is impossible for the State to mandate funding levels since the State is not providing the funds.  Oversight will still be local, but nationalized funding and negotiations will result in significant savings and ensure a minimum level of funding for police departments across California.
        Passed by majority after debate
      6. Cap overtime per week for officers and establish California-wide standards to ensure adequate funding.  Exhausted and over-worked officers are more prone to mistakes and less able to engage in critical community outreach.  We must fund our police and support our officers so that compassionate and service-oriented community policing can occur.
    6. California will give preference on promotion to officers with a four-year degree.
      1. California should add a city-year type program that provides scholarships and debt forgiveness for graduates that go into policing so this requirement does not impact the ability to recruit new officers.
      2. Provide scholarships for police officers who want to complete a four-year degree.
    7. All hiring bans on applicants with high IQ’s shall be immediately removed.

    Court and criminal justice reforms

    1. Immediate priorities:
      1. Eliminate mandatory minimums for nonviolent crimes and juveniles
      2. Juveniles should never tried in adult courts
      3. Ban seizures of property without conviction.
      4. End the drug war and adopt a harm-reduction policy which treats addiction as a disease, not a crime.
        1. We advocate legalization and taxation of drugs for adults.  People have a civil right to do to their bodies whatever they please as long as no one else is harmed.
        2. Legalization removes the problem from the criminal justice system and taxation eliminates the criminal element, and provides funding to the health system to enable people to make better choices, and get ‘off’.
        3. Addiction should be treated as a disease, not a crime. This approach will save billions in enforcement and undercut organized crime that sees prohibition as a cash cow.
        4. People will still be criminally liable for endangerment of others, neglect of children, or other negative behaviors that may result from drug addiction.
        5. Portugal and Denmark have had excellent results from this approach, California should learn from their innovation here and adopt a locally appropriate plan to implement similar policies.
    2. Post-independence:
      1. County Structure Reforms: There shall be only one system of California Law encompassing all Criminal and Civil matters.  US federal laws will not apply in an independent California.
      2. Court Continuity: The current structure of the California Judiciary within the California Republic shall remain as it is currently composed, altered merely to adjust for the removal of the US Federal Court System and the resulting primacy of the legal system of the California Republic.

    Education

    Adopted by consensus 9/10/2016

    California must ensure Equality of Opportunity for all students to help overcome cross-generational poverty. There is a huge opportunity costs to denying education to people because of class and CA cannot afford to continue paying that cost. To do so we must better support our teachers and make sure that educators have the tools they need to support our young people.

          1. Decisions about day to day operations of public schools must be made by administrators and educators with significant teaching experience. Currently, logistical decisions about how schools are run are often made by politicians who have no experience teaching.
          2. Major investment in STEM fields, particularly in historically disadvantaged communities, as part of commitment to produce many more engineers and highly skilled professionals.
            1. We have incredibly high unemployment among young people of color and a severe shortage of engineers for CA tech companies. These problems can solve each other.
          3. Statewide history and science curriculum so as long as we stay part of US, Californian schools aren’t stuck with the Texan curriculum (which is de facto US standard because Texas sets curriculum statewide and so is the biggest single market).
            1. Greater emphasis on California history and on diverse histories of Californians – Irish, Chinese, Mexican, African, Native, etc. histories are all important parts of Californian history and should be given appropriate time and pride of place in our classrooms. Curriculum should be integrated and weave all these histories together as a cohesive whole in order to more accurately reflect the history of all Californians.
            2. Science curriculum needs to include critical thinking and how to weigh evidence and separate legitimate science from pseudo-scientific nonsense.
          4. Class size caps set by subject area and actually enforced.
          5. Allow public schools to incorporate online learning tools to expand available curriculum. Statewide development or approval of pre-existing online curriculum so local districts can deploy it as-needed with minimal cost. Require a minimum number of in-person classes and supervision to make sure instruction actually happens.
          6. Major investments in hardware and data infrastructure at all public schools. Reference data infrastructure point under ‘Platform for Growth’
          7. Make multilingual education standard. By 2030 all California students should be fluent in English and at least one other language by the time they graduate.  Long-term our goal is fluency in 3 languages but this will require significant systematic changes.
          8. Curriculum should leverage online tools to gain credible written and spoken fluency in their language(s) of choice instead of being restricted by locally available teaching staff.
            1. We should also leverage online resources to add standardized testing in other languages where no testing options are currently available (Hindi, Tagalog, etc.).
          9. Overhaul of Teacher retention and review policies. California loses 30-50% of new teachers in their first 5 years due to lack of support. This makes it very difficult to maintain staff over time.
            1. Revamp teacher induction programs to provide better support for new teachers and help ensure consistent standards of quality between districts.
            2. Guarantees of Academic freedom for teachers. Performance should be evaluated using 360 review by peers, superiors, and students for all teachers to ensure quality of instruction
            3. Guarantee ability for teachers to move from one district to another without losing seniority so teachers can move to districts where they live without losing pay when they move.
              • This is a gender equity issue since teachers skew female and often move when their partners move for new jobs. Forcing them to take a pay cut for no good reason contributes to gender pay gap and costs us good teachers.
            4. Support for ongoing training, including leadership and professional development training, so teachers can stay up to date on new knowledge and provide the best quality of instruction.
              1. This ensures that teachers who want to rise through ranks to become administrators have support to do so.  This is important to help close the gender gap between teachers and administrators and to increase the number of administrators with classroom experience.  It also will support them learning new languages so we can meet our multilingual education targets.
          10. National funding for universal pre-k education.
          11. A maximum in funding difference of 15% per student between school districts.
            1. This gives California flexibility to provide higher salaries in more expensive areas while guaranteeing that no schools are left behind. New Jersey has had great success with this.
          12. Increased support at all levels for working class students to apply to colleges.
          13. Increased funding for new trade schools, colleges, and universities statewide to meet growing demand for highly educated workforce.
          14. Publicly funded college tuition at public universities and trade schools for top 50% of public school graduates who maintain a 3.0 GPA and price caps on tuition for all others. College should be affordable for everyone.
            1. Free tuition should require at least 2 years of public high school so private school students can’t just transfer to public in the last month to take advantage of this.
            2. This provides an incentive for parents to keep their kids in public schools instead of wealthy parents opting for private schools and public schools being left with only those who can’t afford private, as has happened in some CA districts.
            3. Students who drop below that GPA only have to pay tuition going forward and can earn their way back onto their scholarship by meeting reasonable targets.
  • Immigration Reform
    Adopted by majority vote 9/10/2016

    The US’s immigration system is deeply broken and remains broken because big business has a vested interest in keeping a large population of undocumented workers available who can be easily exploited and deported if they try to organize. This is detrimental to the economy, culture, and well-being of California as a whole and must be ended.

          1. The Californian government should assign a working group of experts with the goal of proposing a statewide plan to deal with issues of immigration and citizenship since the federal government has abdicated its responsibility to do so.
          2. We believe that this plan must include the offer Californian citizenship for people who can prove five years of continuous residency within the California.
          3. If the federal government will not offer a path to US citizenship, California should act unilaterally and offer a provisional Californian citizenship with the right to vote in Californian elections. Upon independence, this would become a full citizenship of the Republic of California.
          4. We also believe that any effective approach must include prosecuting and penalizing businesses that routinely hire undocumented workers. As long as there are hungry and desperate people in the world and corporations offering them jobs, people will come. The only way to stop the flow of undocumented people is to reduce the demand for their labor.
          5. In order to meet the needs of our agricultural sector without relying on undocumented labor, we should implement a guest worker program that allows people to retain their nation of origin citizenship, with a tax structure that contributes to the Californian economy with appropriate protections (including the right to organize) for the workers.
  • Platform for Equality
    For the CNP, Californian values mean a deep commitment to social justice and equality for all people. These are our proposals to achieve those ends, which are integrated throughout the platform and gathered here for reference.

    From our Rule of Law plank

    1. California should add language to our Constitution guaranteeing equality of opportunity for all Californians regardless of race, religion, orientation, gender, class, or other status.
      • As an organization, the CNP will place particular emphasis on including and empowering historically marginalized communities.
      • As a nation, California must do better to make sure that our young people have the opportunity to live up to their full potential. We cannot guarantee equality of outcomes, but everyone should at least have a chance.
      • This commitment must be more than just words and be reflected in all policy positions and actions.
    2. The CNP endorses equal pay for equal work for all genders and individuals regardless of race, sexual orientation, or religion.

    From our Platform for Prosperity

    1. We propose a ban on high-interest payday loan and check cashing businesses that prey on poor and working class people and charge unconscionable fees for basic services.  We propose to instead add branches of the national credit union to all post offices to make sure that all Californians have access to low-cost banking services in their local communities.
    2. Housing-First approach to reintegrating homeless people with the goal of ending homelessness in California.  This approach must integrate health care, counseling, job training, and a full range of supportive services.
      • A supportive housing-first approach actually costs less once the reduction in emergency room costs are factored in.
      • We demand a federal ban on bussing programs where cities and counties across America “solve” their homelessness problems by giving people 1-way tickets out of town.  A disproportionate number of those people end up in California and it is not fair to expect California to pay to rehabilitate the rest of America’s homeless population.
      • In cases where the State of California can positively identify that someone receiving public assistance here arrived via one of these programs, we should bill the municipality that sent them for the cost of services plus a significant penalty.
    3. Encourage entrepreneurship among working class communities where people lack the skills and connections that make so many startups run by wealthier people possible.
      • The Republic of California will fund free public classes on how to start and run a business successfully.
      • California will make micro-credit loans available through the national credit union to individuals who complete courses or have equivalent experience and can produce a viable risk-assessed business plan; as well as meeting other reasonable requirements.  Micro-credit loans have been proven effective at bringing people, and women in particular, out of poverty all over the world.  They also have very high payback rates.
    4. We advocate adding funding for mid-career retraining. Changing technology means whole industries are becoming obsolete and the average worker will change industries multiple times.  We need our workforce to be able to re-train to seize new opportunities. This must include:
      • Investment into adult education and community college courses to help people change careers and move into strategic including STEM.
      • Public-private partnership to help place graduates of these programs into jobs in the relevant industries.
      • These programs must be accessible to low-income and working class people.  To that end we support providing scholarships, cost of living supports, transportation costs, and low-interest loans as well as counseling and placement resources.  Anyone who wants to lift their family out of poverty should be able to access the resources needed to do so.
    5. Six months of mandatory parental leave for all new parents at full pay, which is in-line with the norms in the rest of the industrialized world.
      • Parental leave is important for bonding between parents and new children and has significant benefits for the health of children. It is also a feminist issue because women are currently more likely than men to leave the work force to care for children, which gives employers a reason to not hire or promote them. It also puts working mothers at a disadvantage in the job market because they have gaps in their employment history. Making the time mandatory and apply to both parents eliminates the incentive to discriminate.
    6. The Californian government must support and defend the right of workers to organize for collective bargaining, forming unions, and advocating for their collective interests.

    Our Judicial Reform plank

    The proposals in this plank are designed to combat police brutality and eliminate mass incarceration, which disproportionately impacts people of color and the working class. It was written after careful study of proposals put forward by the ACLU, leading civil rights campaigns, and other similar organizations.

    From our Education Reform platform

    California must ensure Equality of Opportunity for all students to help overcome cross-generational poverty. There is a huge opportunity costs to denying education to people because of class and CA cannot afford to continue paying that cost. To do so we must better support our teachers and make sure that educators have the tools they need to support our young people.

    1. Major investment in STEM fields, particularly in historically disadvantaged communities, as part of commitment to produce many more engineers and highly skilled professionals.
      1. We have incredibly high unemployment among young people of color and a severe shortage of engineers for CA tech companies. These problems can solve each other.
    2. Greater emphasis on California history and on diverse histories of Californians – Irish, Chinese, Mexican, African, Native, etc. histories are all important parts of Californian history and should be given appropriate time and pride of place in our classrooms. Curriculum should be integrated and weave all these histories together as a cohesive whole in order to more accurately reflect the history of all Californians.
    3. Class size caps set by subject area and actually enforced.
      • This is a social justice issue because students in low income districts are far more likely to be impacted by large class sizes, which make it harder for teachers to teach and unfairly deprive our young people of the support they need to learn and achieve their potential.
    4. Guarantee ability for teachers to move from one district to another without losing seniority so teachers can move to districts where they live without losing pay when they move.
      • This is a gender equity issue since teachers skew female and often move when their partners move for new jobs. Forcing them to take a pay cut for no good reason contributes to gender pay gap and costs us good teachers.
    5. National funding for universal pre-k education.
      • Students who attend pre-k have lasting gains in academic achievement but these programs being privately funded means that poor and working class children are unfairly deprived of access to this critical head start. Childcare costs are also much more difficult for low income people to afford and so this is a quality of life issue for the parents as well.
    6. Publicly funded college tuition at public universities and trade schools for top 50% of public school graduates who maintain a 3.0 GPA and price caps on tuition for all others. College should be affordable for everyone.
      1. Free tuition should require at least 2 years of public high school so private school students can’t just transfer to public in the last month to take advantage of this.
      2. This provides an incentive for parents to keep their kids in public schools instead of wealthy parents opting for private schools and public schools being left with only those who can’t afford private, as has happened in some CA districts.
      3. Students who drop below that GPA only have to pay tuition going forward and can earn their way back onto their scholarship by meeting reasonable targets.

    Our Immigration platform plank

    Our common-sense approach to immigration reform places the emphasis on reducing demand for undocumented labor by penalizing the businesses that actively seek out undocumented workers because they are vulnerable and easier to exploit. This approach will dramatically reduce the flow of incoming undocumented people without breaking up families. We also include a proposal for a guest worker program with garauntees of decent pay, working conditions, and the right to organize. California has always employed migratory labor in our agricultural sector and we must recognize the real value that these workers add to our economy and give them the respect and dignity they deserve. Finally, we offer a path to citizenship for people who can prove they have lived here and contributed for at least 5 years and are willing to pay appropriate fines as recompense to society for their violation of immigration laws.

    Quality of life for working class people of all colors

    1. We advocate universal health care as outlined in our healthcare platform.  This is a social justice issue because lack of access to healthcare directly results in reduced quality and length of life and disproportionately impacts low income and working class people of all colors.
    2. We support high speed rail and major upgrades and expansion for BART and other regional transit systemsstate-wide . (from our Platform for growth).
      • Accessible and affordable public transit is a social justice and quality of life issue because the elderly and people with disabilities often cannot drive. Disabled people in particular experience extreme limitations on their employment options in areas without adequate public transit. Low income people are also particularly impacted by America’s over-reliance on cars since purchasing, maintaining, and ensuring a car consumes a disproportionate share of their scarce financial resources.
  • Independence
    Adopted by consensus 9/10/2016

    The California National Party believes the state of California should enter into good faith negotiations with the United States Government to recognize the results of a fair and honest independence referendum.

    According to both domestic and international law, the people of California have the legal right to political self-determination, should they choose to exercise it.  The legal basis for this claim is as follows:

    1. The Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution says each State in the Union shall respectively retain every power which is not by the Constitution delegated to the Congress of the United States or to the departments of the Federal Government. The Constitution does not explicitly delegate the Federal Government the power to hold a State in the union against the will of its people, nor does it prohibit the states from exercising the right to secede. Therefore, the power of secession is reserved to the states, or to the people, per the Tenth Amendment.
    2. The United States Constitution says that a treaty ratified by Congress is the supreme law of the land. Considering that the United States Congress ratified the Charter of the United Nations, a treaty, that Charter is the supreme law of the land in the United States.
    3. The United Nations Charter guarantees peoples the right to self-determination. The California National Party believes that the people of California are “a people” in their own right and therefore takes the position that we as a people, “Californians”, are entitled to the guarantee of self-determination. Any attempt by the United States  to prevent the people of California from declaring independence through free and open democratic means would therefore be illegal under international law.

    We therefore advocate a popular referendum on independence at the earliest opportunity.  Should the people of California choose to declare independence, we call upon the elected representatives of the Republic of California to move with all deliberate speed to implement that decision and work with our neighbors to make the transition as smooth as possible.

    1. If we the people of California (having participated in a fair and honest independence referendum) express our desire to dissolve the political bonds that tie us to the United States and to establish ourselves as a free, sovereign, and independent Republic, there will be a transition period of not more than 3 years to allow California to make the full transition from statehood to nationhood.
    2. The elected government of the Republic of California shall immediately begin advocating for California’s admission into the United Nations and other trade and defense treaty organizations as befits our status as a major world power and aligns with our values as Californians.

    On Citizenship of the Republic of California

    1. All persons born in California shall become California nationals, eligible for California citizenship should they desire it.
    2. United States Citizens and California Permanent Residents who have maintained residency in California for no less than 5 years shall also be deemed as eligible for California citizenship.
    3. Californian residents who have lived here continuously for 1 year at the time of independence will be eligible for permanent residency and become eligible for citizenship after 5 years.
    4. California nationals serving in the Armed Forces of the United States will also immediately be eligible for California citizenship.
    5. No person shall ever be forced to accept the Californian citizenship to which they are entitled, nor should any person lose their United States citizenship or immigration status as a result of independence.

    On the transition of military assets and the use of bases

    1. The California National Party supports maintaining friendly relations with the United States based on the principles of cooperation and supporting the goals of economic growth and the common defense. Accordingly, the California National Party supports entering into military base agreements with the United States whereby American military installations located in California may be leased to the United States for continued use for a period of time to be determined during the transition period.
    2.  The California Republic will build on the California military reserve and expand its capabilities on land, sea, and air in order to provide for the defense of the California Republic in accordance with our Platform for Defense.

    On the structure of the Californian Government after independence

    High-level beliefs

    1. California is a diverse place and has widely divergent views on a range of issues. Our Party and the political structures we advocate post-independence should reflect that.
    2. We believe that unless there is a compelling reason for something to be decided nationally or regionally it should be decided at the most local level possible.
    3. The default should always be that a more local government can overrule higher levels unless a power has been explicitly delegated to the higher body.
    4. In cases where there is a compelling reason for regional or national planning, we need more effective tools in place to facilitate it.
    5. We believe the American two-party system is fundamentally undemocratic and want to ensure that California does not duplicate that system.

    We therefore propose the following course of action to address these issues:

    1. We call for a new national constitutional convention to be held within six months of a successful vote for independence.
    2. Each County and sovereign indigenous Californian nation will send two delegates to this convention with the goal of creating the legal framework and delineation of powers for a new national government.
    3. This document will become the supreme law of the land if and when it is approved by 2/3 of the citizens of California.
    4. Our new national government  thereby becomes limited to certain denoted powers which shall be determined at the constitutional convention and which shall be considerably circumscribed as compared to existing Federal overreach.
    5. We also strongly advocate for the use of proportional representation and ranked choice voting in order to remove the incentive to vote for a “lesser evil”.